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T/A - Green or red on a volume indicators

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
For every trade there is a seller and a buyer.

Can someone tell me what makes a bar GREEN or RED on a volume indicator on a intraday chart?
post #2 of 13
Green bars indicate that the price closed higher on that tick.
Red, the tick was open higher, closed lower.
post #3 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by StockJock-e View Post
Green bars indicate that the price closed higher on that tick.
Red, the tick was open higher, closed lower.
Thanks... that makes sense
post #4 of 13
Thread Starter 
What about when the price opened and closed at same level.

ASK for example is .078
Someone buys 4 million share at .078 and the ask stays at .078

Now why is the bar on volume indicator RED?
post #5 of 13
Last tick was probably a sell.
post #6 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by StockJock-e View Post
Last tick was probably a sell.
So red volume doesn't mean anything bad? As long as there's volume coming in we're good?
post #7 of 13
I would not place too much emphasis on this indicator, price movement and total volume is more important.
post #8 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by StockJock-e View Post
I would not place too much emphasis on this indicator, price movement and total volume is more important.
Stockjock I know you been in the market for years.

For a beginner like me, I'm trying to find a technique to start with. I'm studying pincher plays and learning a lot and I think this might be my first technique I'll use to get in the markets.

I don't want to step 1 foot in the markets until I have a plan, an exact plan.

So basically what I'm asking you is for a beginner, what is the easiest technique to start with? Nothing to harsh, but something just to get a feel for?
post #9 of 13
Ive spent many years playing around with indicators, getting very fancy with gann and fibonacci, time cycles etc. At the end of the day, after many years of trial and error, the most simple of things is what has worked best.

Trendlines, volume and simple oscillators like RSI and stochastics, in that order.

Im just talking about my experience, others will insist otherwise, but this is what works for me.
post #10 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by StockJock-e View Post
Ive spent many years playing around with indicators, getting very fancy with gann and fibonacci, time cycles etc. At the end of the day, after many years of trial and error, the most simple of things is what has worked best.

Trendlines, volume and simple oscillators like RSI and stochastics, in that order.

Im just talking about my experience, others will insist otherwise, but this is what works for me.
thanks! I'll keep studying all the indicators.
post #11 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stock King View Post
thanks! I'll keep studying all the indicators.
it seems as though too many indicators can just take u in circles...thats what ive found...but thats just my take...and im a noob!

but theres nothing wrong with knowing as much of it as you can...

*edit: idk why i even posted here cause im not one to be giving out stock advice to the pros!...i just saw stock king whos also from hawaii so i thought id read in..
post #12 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stock King View Post
thanks! I'll keep studying all the indicators.
Fibonnaci will help you a greater deal then most indicators will. In fact RSI and Stochastics aren't typically good for what they are originally designed for. You don't always buy on the cross of the 30, you typically want to look for divergences.

But I wouldn't go much further than the RSI/MACD/Stochastics on the indicators. They all pretty much look the same with a little twist. My best suggestions are to find youtube videos of people who follow the market and watch them every day. You'll learn a lot.
post #13 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by StockJock-e View Post
Ive spent many years playing around with indicators, getting very fancy with gann and fibonacci, time cycles etc. At the end of the day, after many years of trial and error, the most simple of things is what has worked best.

Trendlines, volume and simple oscillators like RSI and stochastics, in that order.

Im just talking about my experience, others will insist otherwise, but this is what works for me.
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